New Alzheimer's blood test almost ready for everyday use

Recent Swedish research has developed a blood test to detect high levels of beta-amyloid at all stages of Alzheimer's disease. According to their own statements, scientists get "a precision that makes the test available for daily clinical use worldwide."

The test detects beta-amyloid at all stages of the disease

Recent Swedish research has developed a blood test to detect high levels of beta-amyloid at all stages of Alzheimer's disease. According to their own statements, scientists get "a precision that makes the test available for daily clinical use worldwide."

Dr. Oskar Hansson of Lund University and dr. Niklas Mattson of Skåne University Hospital, who has been conducting research on blood tests for Alzheimer's disease in recent years, has taken the lead under the direction of Drs. Sebastian Palmqvist participates in a new study on the disease.

This was the efficacy of "fully automated immunoassays" in the detection of beta-amyloids. Blood samples from patients with Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment and people without neuronal disease were used in the study.

The dr team. Palmqvist performed two cross-sectional studies to verify the accuracy of the blood test. The researchers worked with 842 study participants, 265 of whom had mild cognitive impairment. In addition, the researchers used an independent cohort of 237 participants, of which 109 had mild cognitive impairment and 94 had Alzheimer's disease.

Alzheimer's recognize earlier and more precisely

The study found that the test "predicts with high precision levels of beta-amyloid cerebrum at all stages of Alzheimer's disease". Dr. Hansson said, "We are achieving a level of precision that will optimize the test for clinical use worldwide." Dr. Palmqvist adds, "Previous studies on blood tests for Alzheimer's disease have not yielded very clear results, with only minor differences between Alzheimer's disease and the elderly in good health."

The researchers hope the test will soon help to examine potential participants in drug clinical trials and to identify Alzheimer's disease faster and more accurately. The test is designed to provide better access to treatment and a better vision of one's own health. According to the researchers, the test would minimize the number of unnecessary lumbar punctures and PET scans and reduce the cost of testing by 30-50%.

Dr. Palmqvist adds: "The next step is to run the test on a larger research group, where the number of people with underlying Alzheimer's disease is lower to confirm the number of people with Alzheimer's disease. efficiency of our method. " We will soon examine the technique in a comprehensive clinical case study. We hope this confirms our results. "

source:
Palmqvist S, Janelidze S, Stomrud E, et al. Performances of fully automated plasma assays as screening tests for β-amyloid status related to Alzheimer's disease. JAMA Neurol. Posted online 24th June 2019. doi: 10.1001 / jamaneurol.2019.1632