Smart nanoparticles for 21st century medicine 2

Smart nanoparticles for 21st century medicine



05.07.2019 11:56

Conference in Jena: Smart Nanoparticles for 21st Century Medicine

How can drugs be targeted to the body where they are supposed to function – in cancer cells or diseased brain areas? From July 15 to 17, chemists will address this issue at the conference "Innovative Polymers for Nanomedicine in the 21st Century" at the Friedrich-Schiller University of Jena.

How can drugs be targeted to the body where they are supposed to function – in cancer cells or diseased brain areas? From July 15 to 17, chemists will address this issue at the conference "Innovative Polymers for Nanomedicine in the 21st Century" at the Friedrich-Schiller University of Jena.

Intelligent Transportation Systems for Active Ingredients

To be able to place the active ingredients with precision, intelligent systems are needed. These must not only go to their place of use safely, but must also overcome the various defense mechanisms of the body. For this purpose, the active ingredients can be packaged in nano-containers 100 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair. To be used in nanomedicine, these particles need intelligent and tailor-made properties. Nanoparticles carrying glucose molecules on their surface cross the blood-brain barrier. In this way, the drugs can be efficiently routed to the brain, for example for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease or other neurodegenerative diseases. Other substances such as contrast agents or DNA can be targeted in the body. "For applications in nanomedicine, we need a wide range of new materials," said the coordinator of the PolyTarget Collaborative Research Center (PolyB). Michael Gottschaldt of the University of Jena. "The polymers needed for this purpose must, for example, be water-repellent and biodegradable, as is the case for polylactic acids, for example." He adds: "At the conference, self-assembling systems will also be presented to independently assemble into nanostructures with defined biochemical properties."

Nanomedicine, Made in Jena & # 39;

"Many of these innovative materials are being developed and researched in Jena," added the Symposium Facilitator, Prof. dr. Ulrich S. Schubert added. "The Friedrich Schiller University is particularly well represented in nanoscience, for example through the DFG" PolyTarget "Collaborative Research Center, in which nanosystems for the treatment of inflammation are particularly developed," continues Schubert in his role as spokesperson for the SFB. "But the Center for Soft Matter in Jena (JCSM) also brings together the expertise of all faculties in the research and development of innovative polymers."

The international audience of experts attending the symposium in Jena is a good example of the fact that Friedrich Schiller University is one of the hot spots in polymer research. The plenary conference will be held with Prof. Dr. med. Kazunori Kataoka, an international luminary in the field of nanomedicine. Kataoka is General Manager of the Nanomedicine Innovation Center (iCONM) of the Kawasaki Industry Promotion Institute and Professor at the Institute for Future Initiatives of the University of Kawasaki. Tokyo, Japan.


Scientific contact:

Teacher. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert
Institute of Organic Chemistry and Macromolecular Chemistry of the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena
Jena Center for Soft Matter (JCSM) at the Center for Applied Research (ZAF)
Way of the philosophers 7
07743 Jena
Phone: 03641/948201
E-mail: ulrich.schubert[at]uni-jena.de


Further information:

http://www.polytarget.uni-jena.de – additional information on the symposium funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the DFG research center "PolyTarget"


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