WARNING: GRAPHIC IMAGE BELOW

A woman with a family history of head cysts while explaining to a famous dermatologist that over the last year, one of the tumors was turning into "horn" on the back of his head.

In an exclusive clip of TLC's "Dr. Pimple Popper"Lisa," says the patient, told Fox News that growth had begun about a year ago when one of the cysts had erupted.

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"I have a horn coming out of my head," she told Dr. Sandra Lee, better known as "Dr. Pimple Popper."

The growth, described by Lisa as a "horn", had been growing for over a year.
(TLC)

Lisa pointed out other small tumors near her ear and revealed that she had a family history of cysts in her head and that her mother called them "wens". Lee explains that these growths are called hair cysts, which occur in less than 10% of cases. of the population, but are the most common cysts that affect the scalp.

According to National Center for Information on BiotechnologyHair cysts are usually in the form of flesh-colored shoots and it is not uncommon for a patient to inherit the disease. Although they may grow slowly, those whose size changes rapidly may indicate infection or malignancy.

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Cysts can cause pain and a patient may experience complications such as inflammation, cosmetic disfigurement, infection and calcification. Treatment may include surgical removal or radiotherapy and chemotherapy in case of malignant growth.

But in Lisa's case, the trouble started about a year ago, when one of the cysts broke out. She "squeezed it and got to a point where I could not squeeze it anymore, and then it started to get bigger."

Lee separates Lisa's hair to reveal a cutaneous horn or, as she describes it, "a nail gone mad."

"I've already seen skin horns, but it's certainly the biggest skin horn I've ever seen," Lee said. "One of the things I certainly think about with Lisa here is skin cancer because a type of squamous cell carcinoma called keratoacanthoma may look like this."

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Keratoacanthoma is a relatively common growth often associated with previous trauma or injury, but it may be difficult to distinguish it from squamous cell carcinoma, according to the American College of Dermatology Osteopathy.

Lee told Lisa that she was not "completely sure" of what she was, but she suspects a hair cyst that has become uncontrollable due to her family history.

The episode of Lisa will be aired Thursday at 21h ET.