A bank manager, aged 67, suffered a stroke that made him believe that it was acceptable to masturbate "without shame" in front of his loved ones.

  • His family was worried when they noticed radical changes in his behavior.
  • Doctors in Mostoles, near Madrid, have performed several tests on the unnamed man
  • Doctors say his stroke was "silent" – which happens with few symptoms

A 67-year-old man suffered a stroke and felt it was acceptable to masturbate "without shame" in front of his loved ones.

The bank manager's family is worried about seeing radical changes in his behavior and taking him to the hospital.

In addition to masturbating in front of them, relatives told the doctors that he was addressing them with inappropriate sexual words.

A CT scan showed a 5 cm shadow in his frontal lobe, which they thought was similar to a "non-aggressive brain tumor". A team of doctors led by Dr. Rafael García Carretero then pronounced on the diagnosis of sub-acute stroke of the anterior cerebral artery.

Doctors Mostoles, 16 km southwest of Madrid, have conducted several tests on the unnamed man.

The team at the University Hospital of Mostoles did not find any cerebral functional abnormalities and decided to organize a CT scan of the organ.

The CT scan showed a 5 cm shadow in her frontal lobe, which they thought was similar to a "non-aggressive brain tumor".

A team of doctors led by Dr. Rafael García Carretero then pronounced on the diagnosis of sub-acute stroke of the anterior cerebral artery.

Doctors have described his stroke as "silent", that is, without or with very few symptoms.

During the patient's hospitalization for a week, his neurological symptoms improved, the doctor revealed in the BMJ case reports.

Writing in the newspaper, they added: "His relatives said that he was again kind, wise, careful, thoughtful and well mannered."

He has been treated with aspirin and atorvastatin – drugs that have been proven to reduce the risk of having another stroke.

The man attended a follow-up appointment three months later, during which the doctors said he was the same man as before his stroke.

Dr. García Carretero added: "The man has never been aware of his changes and his family has stated that he has trouble interpreting the mood of others."

In the medical journal, the team continued, "Frontal behavior syndromes caused by stroke are rarely reported."

WHAT IS A WHAT?

There are two types of stroke:

1. ISCHEMIC stroke

An ischemic stroke (which accounts for 80% of strokes) occurs when there is a blockage in a blood vessel that prevents the blood from reaching a part of the brain.

2. HEMORRHAGIC stroke

The most rare, a hemorrhagic stroke, occurs when a blood vessel bursts, flooding too much blood from one part of the brain while depriving other areas of a sufficient blood supply .

This can be the result of an AVM or an arteriovenous malformation (an abnormal blood vessel cluster) in the brain.

Thirty percent of meningeal hemorrhage victims die before arriving at the hospital. 25% die within 24 hours. And 40% of the survivors die in the week.

RISK FACTORS

Age, high blood pressure, smoking, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, diabetes, atrial fibrillation, family history, and a history of stroke or TIA are all risk factors for stroke.

Symptoms of an attack

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arms or legs, especially on one side of the body
  • Sudden confusion, difficulty speaking or understanding
  • Sudden difficulty in seeing or blurred vision in one or both eyes
  • Sudden difficulty walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
  • Sudden and severe headache without known cause

RESULTS

Of about three in four people who survive a stroke, many will have permanent disabilities.

This includes difficulty walking, communicating, eating and doing daily housework or chores.

TREATMENT

Both are potentially fatal and patients must undergo surgery or a tPA (Tissue Plasminogen Activator) within three hours to save them.