New York women who survived a so-called "silent" heart Attack uses his experience to remind others that the symptoms of this sometimes fatal event are not always immediately apparent.

Tasha Benjamin, who lives in East Syracuse, New York, says CNYCentral she suffered a silent heart attack – a heart attack that shows little or no symptoms – in 2014.

A MAN FROM NEW YORK DIES FROM A HEART CRISIS WHILE BLOWING SNOW

The busy mother of four never thought that "subtle chest discomfort", jaw and lower back pain, nausea, and vertigo that she felt were signs of the pain. 39, a potentially fatal medical emergency.

"You may not necessarily feel an elephant sitting on your chest, which is sometimes linked to a heart attack.It may be just that you feel nauseous and dizzy and that you can say that it is It's something that I've eaten or that I could be tired of, "said Benjamin.

Indeed: the symptoms of a heart attack may differ from one sex to another and according to the Mayo Clinic, women are "more likely than men to have symptoms of heart attack unrelated to chest pain," which is a common sign of heart attack.

Neck, jaw, shoulder and upper back pain can be a sign of a heart attack in women, as can abdominal discomfort, according to the Mayo Clinic. Shortness of breath, pain in one or both arms, nausea or vomiting, sweating, and "unusual" or extreme fatigue are additional signs.

TWEETS OF WOMEN DETAIL GO VIRAL HEART ATTACK: 'I WAS LUCKY'

Benjamin was informed of her heart attack when she consulted her doctor for a physical examination and underwent an electrocardiogram, more commonly called ECG. The procedure checks the heart rate and can also diagnose a heart attack.

"If I were not going to do physics, I would never have had the ECG, I would never have known that I had a heart attack," he said. she told CNY Central.

Benjamin shared his experience in light of the National Wear Red Day of the American Heart Association, which takes place on February 1 of each year. The event sensitizes to heart disease, especially in women.

"I'm glad we took the time to highlight it, because it happens unfortunately," she added.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

In total, about 735,000 people in the United States suffer from a heart attack each year, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). People with high blood pressure, high cholesterol or who smoke can develop heart disease that can lead to heart attack. In addition, people with diabetes, poor diet or overweight, among other health issues, are also at risk of heart attack, according to the CDC.