A student from Nevada who lost her leg as a result of a infection after being allegedly pushed in front of a train during an attempted robbery in Costa Rica, said his move to New York and his reconnection with God helped her recover from the traumatic incident. Gabrielle Newell, then a student at the University of Nevada, aged 18 and participating in a study abroad program at Heredia, said her abuser wanted her iPod and that she was not safe. she remembered being pushed while the train was approaching, reported SWNS.

"I remember being pushed behind the train," she told the news agency. "It hit me in the head, on the left side. He wanted my iPod. I did not know that my leg was gone while I lay there. He was amputated on the stage below my knee.

She moved to New York just five months after the attack and said she was scared by public transit and strangers.

She moved to New York just five months after the attack and said she was scared by public transit and strangers.
(SWNS)

Newell said that a man had heard her scream for help and had tried to stop the bleeding with a seatbelt before driving her to a nearby hospital, where they had told her that she was safe. it was a "situation of life and death". She said after the surgery that the doctors had made the decision to transfer her because of the aggressiveness of her infection and the fact that she was at risk of losing her knee.

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Newell told SWNS that she had finally been transferred home to Las Vegas, but that doctors had discovered that her leg had become black due to the aggressive infection, usually only present in the rainforest.

"I could not get out of the unit and I fell into depression," she said. "I was so mad at the person who did it to me, but also against me."

The alleged Newell assailant was never arrested, and Newell was struggling to find the closure.

She now runs a YouTube channel that describes her life and says she hopes it will help others.

She now runs a YouTube channel that describes her life and says she hopes it will help others.
(SWNS)

Just five months later, Newell decided to move to St. John's University in New York, where she had to deal with her fear of public transit and adjust to her new standard without two legs. She said that walking with a prosthesis was painful and that accepting to be amputated now was difficult.

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"People have made me nervous," she said. "The accident made me lose my innocence and I did not trust anyone. I always looked over my shoulder. "

But in 2016, Newell reconnected with her faith and started reading the Bible, which she said really resonated with her. Since then, she has returned to Nevada and decided to help others by documenting her life on YouTube. She said that her relationship with God helped her to heal.

"I grew up a lot and I trust people more now," she told SWNS. "My relationship with God has allowed me to heal."