The drug overdose mortality rate at women in the United States has grown significantly, according to the data published this week in the morbidity and mortality report of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

Specifically, the data revealed the drug The overdose mortality rate particularly affected women of middle age. In fact, from 1999 to 2017, the CDC found that the drug overdose mortality rate for women aged 30 to 64 increased by 260%. In other words, the rate increased from "6.7 deaths per 100,000 population (4,314 drug overdose deaths) in 1999 to 24.3 (18,110) in 2017". the health agency said in the report.

FENTANYL NOW THE MEDICINE THE BEST IN AMERICA, THE OVERDOSED GROWTH METHOD, CDC DIT

During the same period, the CDC also noted that the number and death rate associated with antidepressants, benzodiazepines, cocaine, heroin and synthetic opioids (excluding methadone) had also increased.

Prescription opioid-related deaths also increased among women aged 30 to 64 between 1999 and 2017, the CDC said, adding that the largest increase was among women aged 55 to 64.

Overall, from 1999 to 2017, the drug overdose mortality rate increased by approximately 200% among women aged 35 to 39 and from 45 to 49, while that of women aged 30 to 34 years and 50 to 54 years has increased by 350%. Most shockingly, however, the rate increased by almost 500% among women aged 55 to 64 during this period, according to the CDC.

In comparison, in 1999, "the rates of overdose deaths were highest among women aged 40 to 44 (9.6 deaths per 100,000 population), while in 2017, rates were highest among women aged 50 to 54 (28.2 years), "explained the CDC.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The CDC has not explained in detail what makes women disproportionately affected, but said that "the number of overdose deaths continues to be excessively high, and that targeted efforts are needed to reduce the number of deaths in this evolving epidemic ".

You can read the CDC's full report right here.